Gabriel SolisThelonious Monk Quartet with John Coltrane at Carnegie Hall

September 7, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Jazz] On November 29, 1957, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holliday, Zoot Sims, Chet Baker, Sonny Rollins, and a multi-talented young R&B player who played jazz that night, Ray Charles, and others played a benefit concert for the Morningside Recreation Center at Carnegie Hall.  Almost a half a century later, these recordings, intended [...]

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Staci ZavattaroCities for Sale: Municipalities as Public Relations and Marketing Firms

September 1, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Staci Zavattaro is the author of the new book Cities for Sale: Municipalities as Public Relations and Marketing Firms (SUNY Press, 2013). Zavattaro is assistant professor of public administration at Mississippi State University. Cities have received renewed interest from political scientists recently. Previously, Ravi K. Perry was on the podcast to discuss [...]

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Matt GrossmannArtists of the Possible: Governing Networks and American Policy Change Since 1945

September 1, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Matt Grossmann is back on the podcast with his newest book, Artists of the Possible: Governing Networks and American Policy Change Since 1945 (Oxford University Press, 2014). Grossmann is associate professor of political science at Michigan State University. He is also author of The Not-So-Special Interests, for which he appeared on the podcast in [...]

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Mark RifkinSettler Common Sense: Queerness and Everyday Colonialism in the American Renaissance

August 21, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Native American Studies] In Settler Common Sense: Queerness and Everyday Colonialism in the American Renaissance  (University of Minnesota Press, 2014), Mark Rifkin, a professor at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro and incoming president of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, explores three of the most canonical authors in the American literary awakening–Hawthorne, Thoreau, [...]

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Glenn FeldmanNation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government

August 18, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Glenn Feldman is the editor of Nation within a Nation: The American South and the Federal Government (University Press of Florida, 2014). Feldman is professor of history at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. He is the author or editor of numerous books, including Painting Dixie Red: When, Where, Why, and How the South [...]

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Matthew HedstromThe Rise of Liberal Religion: Book Culture and American Spirituality in the Twentieth Century

August 8, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Expressions of religious belief through popular media are a regular occurrence in our contemporary age. But the circulation and negotiation of religious identities in public contexts has a fairly long history in America culture. Matthew Hedstrom, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia, looks beyond the church to determine [...]

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Shabana MirMuslim American Women on Campus: Undergraduate Social Life and Identity

August 4, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] In the post 9/11 era in which Muslims in America have increasingly felt under the surveillance of the state, media, and the larger society, how have female Muslim students on US college campuses imagined, performed, and negotiated their religious lives and identities? That is the central question that animates [...]

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John L. Campbell and Ove K. PedersenThe National Origins of Policy Ideas: Knowledge Regimes in the United States, France, Germany, and Denmark

August 4, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] John L. Campbell and Ove K. Pedersen are the authors of The National Origins of Policy Ideas: Knowledge Regimes in the United States, France, Germany, and Denmark (Princeton University Press, 2014). Campbell is the Class of 1925 Professor of Sociology at Dartmouth College and professor of political economy and the Copenhagen Business School. Pederson [...]

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Bruce AckermanWe the People: Volume 3: The Civil Rights Revolution

August 2, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Law] Bruce Ackerman is the Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University. His book, We the People, Volume 3: The Civil Rights Revolution (Harvard UP, 2013) fills out the constitutional history of America’s “Second Reconstruction” period and makes a powerful argument that traditional understandings of the constitutional canon must be expanded to accurately reflect [...]

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Tom WeinerCalled to Serve: Stories of Men and Women Confronted by the Vietnam War Draft

July 31, 2014

In 1969, the United States created and implemented a new method of drafting young men for military service–the “draft lottery.” The old system, whereby local draft boards selected those to enter service, was corrupt and unfair. The new system, whereby men would be chosen at random, would be incorruptible and fair. Or at least so [...]

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