Bonnie J. MannSovereign Masculinity: Gender Lessons from the War on Terror

November 12, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Critical Theory] In the aftermath of 9/11, the American political landscape and its discourses took a peculiar turn. America’s national sovereignty-conceived as the expression of its indomitable masculinity-had been challenged. Its mythical invulnerability had been crushed. The response of the United States to these events was both disturbing and enlightening. It [...]

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Mike O’ConnorA Commercial Republic: America’s Enduring Debate over Democratic Capitalism

November 10, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Mike O’Connor is the author of A Commercial Republic: America’s Enduring Debate over Democratic Capitalism (University Press of Kansas 2014). He has also published articles in Contemporary Pragmatism and The Sixties. O’Connor teaches at Georgia State University in Atlanta, and holds a Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Texas at Austin. He was [...]

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Nadine HubbsRednecks, Queers, and Country Music

November 5, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Pop Culture] Academics don’t pay enough attention to class.  And when we do, too often we only magnify the tendency for working class subjects to be defined according to middle class norms; and according to those norms, they, not surprisingly, fail in one way or another, justifying their position beneath the middle [...]

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John Morrow and Jeffrey SammonsHarlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality

November 4, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Military History] John Morrow and Jeffrey Sammons share their insights on the story of the fabled 369th Infantry Regiment in their book, Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality (University Press of Kansas, 2014).  Our guests reveal a great deal about the state of African Americans in prewar New [...]

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Catherine W. BishirCrafting Lives: African American Artisans in New Bern, North Carolina, 1770-1900

October 28, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in African American Studies]  Seeking to fill the gap in scholarship focused on African American artisans in the American South, Catherine W. Bishir uses the very specific location of New Bern, North Carolina to “dig a deep hole” and produce a longitudinal study of black artisans that moves chronologically from the colonial period, [...]

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Kirk Randazzo and Richard WatermanChecking the Courts: Law, Ideology, and Contingent Discretion

October 27, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Kirk Randazzo is the author (with Richard Waterman) of Checking the Courts: Law, Ideology, and Contingent Discretion (SUNY Press 2014). Randazzo is associate professor of political science at the University of South Carolina. He has previously written several books on the courts and foreign policy. How does legislative language affect the courts? Randazzo [...]

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Mason B. WilliamsCity of Ambition: FDR, La Guardia, and the Making of Modern New York

October 23, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] “Today, many New Yorkers take the FDR to get to La Guardia,” Mason B. Williams jokes in the opening line of his new book City of Ambition: FDR, La Guardia, and the Making of Modern New York (W.W. Norton, 2013) . And, depending on where they start, they pass any number of vital, iconic features in [...]

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Carlotta GallThe Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014

October 23, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Middle Eastern Studies] Pulitzer-prize winning New York Times reporter Carlotta Gall reported from Afghanistan and Pakistan for almost the entire duration of the American invasion and occupation, beginning shortly after 9/11. In her new book The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014 (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014), Gall combines searing personal accounts of battles and betrayals with moving portraits [...]

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Bryn UptonHollywood and the End of the Cold War: Signs of Cinematic Change

October 21, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Film] While the Cold War ended in 1991 with a whimper, not a bang, it still affects popular culture in many ways. In his book. Hollywood and the End of the Cold War: Signs of Cinematic Change (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014), Bryn Upton discusses how filmmakers used many of the same Cold War themes in [...]

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Claudio SauntAndrew Epstein: An Uncommon History of 1776

October 21, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Native American Studies] Few years in U.S. history call to mind such immediate stock images as 1776. Powdered wigs. Founding fathers. Red coats. And if asked to place this assembly of objects and people, a few cities stand out: Boston. Philadelphia. Williamsburg, perhaps. This is the small world conjured by the [...]

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