Peter HofferCry Liberty: The Great Stono River Slave Rebellion of 1739

September 26, 2012

In Cry Liberty: The Great Stono River Slave Rebellion of 1739 (Oxford, 2010), Peter C. Hoffer offers a succinct and refreshing new look at the Stono slave rebellion of 1739, an event that has been the subject of much historical scholarship. His main departure from previous interpretations of what actually happened on that fateful night [...]

Read the full article →

Blair RubleWashington’s U Street: A Biography

July 10, 2012

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] I used to live in Washington DC, not far from a place I learned to call the “U Street Corridor.” I really had no idea why it was a “corridor” (most places in DC are just “streets”) or why a lot of folks seemed to make a big deal out [...]

Read the full article →

Brian IngrassiaThe Rise of Gridiron University: Higher Education’s Uneasy Alliance with Big-Time Football

July 10, 2012

[Cross-posted from New Books in Sports] During this week of the 4th of July, it’s appropriate to mark America’s national holiday with a podcast about that most American of sports: college football.  As past guests on the podcast have explained, widely followed, revenue-generating sports teams affiliated with universities are a distinctive feature of American sports culture, and college [...]

Read the full article →

Colin WoodardAmerican Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

July 10, 2012

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] Europeans like to say that “America” (aka the “United States”) is not a nation. They are right and wrong. It’s true that Americans come from all over the place, unlike, say, Germans.  Just ask an American where she comes from. She’s likely to reply that she comes from Ireland, Africa, [...]

Read the full article →

Cynthia WachtellWar No More: The Antiwar Impulse in American Literature, 1861-1914

July 10, 2012

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] My favorite book as a teenager (and in fact the only book I ever read as a teenager) was All Quiet on the Western Front. I liked it mostly for the vivid scenes of trench warfare. Teenage boys love that stuff (or at least I did). But even then I recognized [...]

Read the full article →

Matthew DennisSeneca Possessed: Indians, Witchcraft, and Power in the Early American Republic

July 10, 2012

[Cross-posted from New Books in Native American Studies] The birth of the American republic produced immense and existential challenges to Native people in proximity to the fledgling nation. Perhaps none faced a greater predicament than the Six Nations of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy (popularly known as the Iroquois). Divided by the U.S.-English conflict, their landbase ransacked by American [...]

Read the full article →