H. Paul Thompson Jr.A Most Stirring and Significant Episode: Religion and the Rise and Fall of Prohibition in Black Atlanta, 1865-1887

July 8, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in African American Studies] The American Temperance Movement remains an interesting and important topic. Considering the various attitudes that influenced laws about alcohol sale and consumption of the past are often referred to when reviewing issues related to liquor legislation today. However, what may not be as readily considered is the role that [...]

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Andrew KarchEarly Start: Preschool Politics in the United States

July 8, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Book in Political Science] Over the last several months, I’ve had the pleasure to have a number of political scientists who study education policy on the podcast. Jesse Rhodes, Jeff Henig, and Sarah Reckhow have brought their new books that have focused mainly on the K-12 education system. Andrew Karch offers something different. Karch has [...]

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Nathaniel ComfortThe Science of Human Perfection: How Genes Became the Heart of American Medicine

July 6, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Science, Technology, and Society] “This is a history of promises.”So begins Nathaniel Comfort’s gripping and beautifully written new book on the relationships between and entanglements of medical genetic and eugenics in the history of the twentieth century. Based on a rich documentary and oral history archive, The Science of Human Perfection: How Genes Became the [...]

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Dale MaharidgeBringing Mulligan Home: The Other Side of the Good War

July 3, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Military History] Dale Maharidge’s Bringing Mulligan Home: The Other Side of the Good War (PublicAffairs, 2013) is something of a departure from our regular offerings. Normally our authors are established academics specializing in the field of military history. Dale Maharidge, however, is an award-winning journalist who, prior to Bringing Mulligan Home, has had [...]

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D.X. FerrisReign in Blood

July 2, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Pop Music] By the fall of 1986, the Los Angeles heavy metal band Slayer had two solid but unspectacular records, 1984′s Haunting the Chapel and 1985′s Hell Awaits, to their name.  Meanwhile, producer Rick Rubin had started a record company, Def Jam, in his dorm room in NYU, and after a handful of successful rap [...]

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Christine Trost and Lawrence Rosenthal, eds.Steep: The Precipitous Rise of the Tea Party

July 1, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Christine Trost is program director of the Center for Right-Wing Studies and associate director of the UC Berkeley’s Institute for the Study of Societal Issues. Her co-editor is Lawrence Rosenthal, executive director and lead researchers of Center for Right-Wing Studies at Berkeley. The volume includes chapters by scholars such Alan Abramowitz [...]

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Daniel KilbrideBeing American in Europe: 1750-1860

June 28, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] When Americans go overseas, they know just who they are–Americans. But what was it like for a citizen of the United States to go abroad before there was a clear idea of what an “American” was? This is one (among many) of the fascinating questions Daniel Kilbride addresses in his equally [...]

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Drew MaciagEdmund Burke in America: The Contested Career of the Father of Modern Conservatism

June 28, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Intellectual History] Drew Maciag, author of Edmund Burke in America: The Contested Career of the Father of Modern Conservatism (Cornell University Press, 2013) spoke with Ray Haberski about the intellectual challenges Burke raised in a time of democratic revolutions and the legacy he left for thinkers who attempted to leverage tradition in the face [...]

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Colin GordonGrowing Apart: A Political History of American Inequality

June 25, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Big Ideas] Americans seem to be more concerned about economic inequality today than they have been in living memory. The Occupy Movement (“We are the 99%”) is only the most visible sign of this growing unease. But what are the dimensions of inequality in the United States? How have they [...]

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David VaughtThe Farmer’s Game: Baseball in Rural America

June 22, 2013

Contemporary baseball seems like a big city game. Major League Baseball does not have a Green Bay Packers, a small-market team that can contend with the big shots. As David Vaught reminds us in The Farmer’s Game: Baseball in Rural America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013), however, baseball has rural roots. Stepping back into 19th [...]

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