Elizabeth A. Armstrong and Laura T. HamiltonPaying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality

August 9, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Big Ideas] One of the basic rules of human behavior is that people generally want to do what their peers do. If your friends like jazz, you’ll probably like jazz. If your friends want to go to the movies, you’ll probably want to go to the movies. If your friends enjoy [...]

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Matthew W. HugheyWhite Bound: Nationalists, Antiracists, and the Shared Meanings of Race

August 9, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in African American Studies] Whiteness studies has confirmed that race is a social construction, even for whites, and that the identity we understand as white is also a social invention. Those who benefit from this invention accrue privileges that others either must pay dearly to obtain or cannot have at all. But [...]

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David GarlandPeculiar Institution: America’s Death Penalty in an Age of Abolition

August 5, 2013

Why is it that the United States continues to enforce the death penalty when the rest of the Western world abolished its use a little over three decades ago? That question, along with many other equally important questions, is at the heart of Dr. David Garland’s recent book Peculiar Institution: America’s Death Penalty in an [...]

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Ron Schmidt, et al.Newcomers, Outsiders, and Insiders: Immigrants and the American Racial Politics in the Early 21st Century

August 5, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Ron Schmidt is the co-author (with Yvette M. Alex-Assensoh, Andrew L. Aoki, and Rodney Hero) of Newcomers, Outsiders, and Insiders: Immigrants and the American Racial Politics in the Early 21st Century (University of Michigan Press, 2013). Schmidt is professor of political science at California State University Long Beach. This is a big [...]

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Marian Moser JonesThe American Red Cross from Clara Barton to the New Deal

July 26, 2013

Is there an institution in the United States that enjoys a better reputation than the American Red Cross? In her thorough, accessible new book The American Red Cross from Clara Barton to the New Deal (Johns Hopkins UP, 2012), Marian Moser Jones (associate professor of family science, University of Maryland School of Public Health) traces the history [...]

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Edward J. Blum and Paul HarveyThe Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America

July 25, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Jesus has inspired millions of people to both strive for social justice and commit horrific acts of violence. In the United States, Jesus has remained central in the construction of American identities and debates about Jesus have frequently revolved around his skin color and bodily appearance. In The Color of Christ: The [...]

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Barbara Palmer and Dennis SimonWomen and Congressional Elections: A Century of Change

July 22, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Barbara Palmer and Dennis Simon are authors of Women and Congressional Elections: A Century of Change (Lynne Rienner, 2012). Palmer is associate professor of political science at Baldwin Wallace University and Dixon is professor of political science at Southern Methodist University. They have combined to write a deeply informative book about the trajectory of [...]

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Andrew J. TaylorCongress: A Performance Appraisal

July 15, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Andrew J. Taylor is the author of Congress: A Performance Appraisal (Westview Press, 2013). Taylor is professor of political science in the School of Public and International Affairs at North Carolina State University. His newest book examines the much maligned branch of government and offers some help. He takes the novel approach [...]

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Elaine RichardsonPHD to Ph.D.: How Education Saved My Life

July 12, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in African American Studies] Elaine Richardson recounts the Jamaican mother wit that her “mama dished out…in artless artful sayings” but that Richardson “tried to desperately dismiss” in her new literacy narrative. Yet, it is those sayings that undergird Richardson’s theorizing about African American and Jamaican identity, education, gender, literacy, and sexuality in her [...]

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John Earl Haynes, Harvey Klehr, and Alexander VassilievSpies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America

July 10, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] For decades, the American Right and Left argued about the degree to which the KGB infiltrated the U.S. political and scientific establishment. The Right said “A lot”; the Left said “Much less than you think.” Both sides did a lot of finger-pointing and, sadly, slandering. Things got very ugly. At the [...]

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