Cindy HooperConflict: African American Women and the New Dilemma of Race and Gender Politics

January 29, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in African American Studies] Cindy Hooper is a veteran of various local, state, and national political campaigns. She is the founder of a national organization for African American women that is headquartered in Washington, D.C. Hooper is also a member of the American Political Science Association. Her new book, Conflict: African American Women and [...]

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Patrick WeilThe Sovereign Citizen: Denaturalization and the Origins of the American Republic

January 28, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Law] Patrick Weil is the author of The Sovereign Citizen: Denaturalization and the Origins of the American Republic (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013). He is a visiting Professor of Law at Yale Law School and a senior research fellow at the French National Research Center in the University of Paris 1, Pantheon-Sorbonne. The Sovereign Citizen [...]

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Amy L. WoodLynching and Spectacle: Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1890-1940

January 25, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in African American Studies] Host Jonathan Judaken talks with author and professor Amy Wood about her book, Lynching and Spectacle: Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1890-1940 (University of North Carolina Press, 2011). Wood discusses her book, the use of photography and media in the spectacle of lynching, religious justification for the practice, and the importance of [...]

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Jay WexlerThe Odd Clauses: Understanding the Constitution Through Ten of Its Most Curious Provisions

January 23, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Law] Boston University School of Law Professor Jay Wexler offers readers an entertaining and enlightening tour through a “constitutional zoo” of ten strange-yet-important provisions of the Constitution of the United States in The Odd Clauses: Understanding the Constitution Through Ten of Its Most Curious Provisions (Beacon, 2012). As the nation’s foremost scholar of Supreme Court [...]

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Keith WatersThe Studio Recordings of the Miles Davis Quintet, 1965-1968

January 18, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Jazz] “…when people were hearing us, they were hearing the avant-garde on the one hand, and they were hearing the history of jazz that led up to it on the other hand – because Miles was that history.” -Herbie Hancock, 1968 Professor of music and musician/composer Keith Waters at the University of Colorado, [...]

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Susan WareGame, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women’s Sports

January 17, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] If you’re younger than 45 or so, you probably don’t remember the “Battle of the Sexes.”  This tennis match, between Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean King, is one of the iconic moments in American history of the 1970s. It represented a breakthrough moment for women in sports, a symbol of the [...]

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Rick BaldozThe Third Asiatic Invasion: Migration and Empire in Filipino America, 1898-1946

January 16, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Asian American Studies] Rick Baldoz is the author of The Third Asiatic Invasion: Migration and Empire in Filipino America, 1898-1946 (NYU Press, 2011), which investigates the complex relationship between the U.S. and Filipinos. Unlike other Asian American groups, Filipinos were considered colonial subjects of the American empire, and therefore were granted more rights and were defined [...]

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Christina GreerBlack Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream

January 13, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Christina Greer is the author of Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press, 2013). Greer is assistant professor of political science at Fordham University. In previous podcasts, authors have illuminated the immigrant experience of Latino and Asian Americans (Rouse, Masuoka and Junn), as well as the [...]

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Natalie Masuoka and Jane JunnThe Politics of Belonging: Race, Public Opinion, and Immigration

January 6, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] On the podcast over the last few months, we’ve heard from Phil Krestedemas, Ron Schmidt, Shannon Gleeson about various aspects of immigration and immigrants in the US. Adding to this impressive list is Natalie Masuoka and Jane Junn are authors of The Politics of Belonging: Race, Public Opinion, and Immigration (University of Chicago Press, 2013). [...]

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Conevery Bolton ValenciusThe Lost History of the New Madrid Earthquakes

December 28, 2013

[Cross-posted from New Books in Science, Technology, and Society] The story begins with Davy Crockett and his hunting dogs chasing a bear in 1826. The bear gets caught in an earthquake crack, an effect of the great Mississippi Valley earthquakes of 1811-1812 that are now collectively known as the New Madrid earthquakes. In The Lost History of [...]

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