Jennifer Stromer-GalleyPresidential Campaigning in the Internet Age

Oxford University Press, 2014

by Jasmine McNealy on April 18, 2014

Jennifer Stromer-Galley

View on Amazon

[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] Digital Communications Technologies, or DCTs, like the Internet offer the infrastructure and means of forming a networked society. These technologies, now, are a mainstay of political campaigns on every level, from city, to state, to congressional, and, of course, presidential. In her new book, Presidential Campaigning in the Internet Age  (Oxford University Press, 2014), Jennifer Stromer-Galley, an associate professor in the iSchool at Syracuse University, discusses the impact of DCTs on presidential campaigning. In particular, Stromer-Galley takes a historical look at the past five presidential campaigns and the use of the Internet by incumbents and challengers to win the election. The promise of DCTs with respect to political campaigning was greater citizen participation in the democratic process. Stromer-Galley analyzes whether DCTs have lived up to this promise, or if the idea of the Internet promoting great political engagement is merely a myth.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Vershawn Young, Rusty Barrett, Y’Shanda Young-Rivera, and Kim Brian LovejoyOther People’s English: Code-Meshing, Code-Switching, and African American Literacy

April 15, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Book in Language] In linguistics, we all happily and glibly affirm that there is no “better” or “worse” among languages (or dialects, or varieties), although we freely admit that people have irrational prejudices about them. But what do we do about those prejudices? And what do we think the speakers of low-status varieties of [...]

Read the full article →

Zareena GrewalIslam is a Foreign Country: American Muslims and the Global Crisis of Authority

April 15, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] Zareena Grewal‘s monograph Islam is a Foreign Country: American Muslims and the Global Crisis of Authority (NYU Press, 2013), seamlessly interweaves ethnographic research with an in-depth historical perspective in order to yield an unparalleled account of American Muslims and their intellectual and spiritual journeys. Where does knowledge come from? Where does [...]

Read the full article →

Jason RuizAmericans in the Treasure House: Travel to Porfirian Mexico and the Cultural Politics of Empire

April 11, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Latin American Studies] In Americans in the Treasure House: Travel to Porfirian Mexico and the Cultural Politics of Empire (University of Texas Press, 2014), Jason Ruiz explores the role of a distinct group of actors in the relationship between the United States and Mexico: American travelers, travel writers and photographers who visited and worked [...]

Read the full article →

Travis VoganKeepers of the Flame: NFL Films and the Rise of Sports Media

April 4, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Journalism] No professional sports league in the United States wields more social and cultural power than the NFL. It’s not even close. In Keepers of the Flame: NFL Films and the Rise of Sports Media (University of Illinois Press, 2014), Travis Vogan performs a cultural and structural history of the organization that helped shape the NFL into [...]

Read the full article →

David KaiserHow the Hippies Saved Physics: Science, Counterculture, and the Quantum Revival

April 2, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Science, Technology, and Society] David Kaiser’s recent book is one of the most enjoyable and informative books on the history of science that you’ll read, full-stop. The deservedly award-winning How the Hippies Saved Physics: Science, Counterculture, and the Quantum Revival (W.W. Norton, 2012) takes readers into the “hazy, bong-filled excesses of the 1970s New Age movement” [...]

Read the full article →

Nicholas CarnesWhite-Collar Government: The Hidden Role of Class in Economic Policy Making

March 31, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Nicholas Carnes is the author of White-Collar Government: The Hidden Role of Class in Economic Policy Making (University of Chicago Press, 2013). Carnes is an assistant professor of public policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. There is surprisingly little in the research literature on the link [...]

Read the full article →

Steven Noll and David TegederDitch of Dreams: The Cross-Florida Barge Canal and the Struggle for Florida’s Future

March 19, 2014

The environmental movement is such an integral part of our culture — and especially the culture of the Democratic Party — that we take its presence for granted. But as Dave Tegeder and Steve Noll explain in their book Ditch of Dreams, it has not always been so. The Democratic Party once endorsed grand schemes [...]

Read the full article →

Joshua DublerDown in the Chapel: Religious Life in an American Prison

March 19, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] In almost every prison movie you see, there is a group of fanatically religious inmates. They are almost always led by a charismatic leader, an outsized father-figure who is loved by his acolytes and feared by nearly everyone else. They’re usually black Muslims, but you also see the occasional born-again Christian [...]

Read the full article →

Jon MooallemWild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals In America

March 19, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Environmental Studies] Jon Mooallem’s book Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals In America (Penguin, 2013) is a tour of a few places on the North American continent where animal species are on the very brink of extinction. What emerges is as much a story [...]

Read the full article →