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Kirt von DaackeFreedom Has a Face: Race, Identity, and Community in Jefferson’s Virginia

University of Virginia Press, 2012

by Siobhan Barco on April 16, 2015

Kirt von Daacke

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In this podcast I talk to Kirt von Daacke about his 2012 work, Freedom Has a Face: Race, Identity, and Community in Jefferson’s Virginia (University of Virginia Press, 2012). Professor von Daacke is Associate Professor of History and Assistant Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia. In this interview a few topics we discuss are:

  • Sources and methods for piecing together a picture of life in Albemarle County and the use of legal documents as a window into a past society
  • The relationship between law on the books and the actual behavior of the inhabitants of Albemarle County
  • Free people of color’s experiences with the legal system
  • The possibilities and the pitfalls awaiting unmarried women of color in the rural antebellum South
  • Some implications of Freedom Has a Face for future work on African American history

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Richard Kreitner, ed.The Almanac: 150 Years of The Nation

April 15, 2015

The Nation magazine is one of America’s most distinguished journalistic enterprises featuring the writing and work of such notable people as Albert Einstein, Emma Goldman, Molly Ivins, I.F. Stone and Hunter S. Thompson. The Nation was founded 150 years ago this July. It’s America’s oldest weekly magazine. To mark its 15oth anniversary, it’s publishing a daily […]

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Carol FaulknerLucretia Mott’s Heresy: Abolition and Women’s Rights in Nineteenth-Century America

April 13, 2015

Carol Faulkner is Professor of History at Syracuse University. Her book Lucretia Mott’s Heresy: Abolition and Women’s Rights in Nineteenth-Century America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011) is a beautifully written biography of the abolitionist and Quaker Lucretia Mott. Committed to liberty and equality based on the divine light within, Mott was one the earliest American […]

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Louis DeSipio and Rodolfo de la GarzaU.S. Immigration in the Twenty-First Century: Making Americans, Remaking America

April 12, 2015

In this week’s podcast, we hear from an author and an editor. First, Louis DeSipio and Rodolfo de la Garza are authors of U.S. Immigration in the Twenty-First Century: Making Americans, Remaking America (Westview Press, 2015). DeSipio is professor of political science and Chicano/Latino studies at University of California, Irvine; de la Garza is Eaton […]

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Kathryn Cramer BrownellShowbiz Politics: Hollywood in American Political Life

April 10, 2015

We are all aware how important professional movie makers are to modern campaigns. Many trace this importance to John F. Kennedy’s presidential victory in 1960. Yet, as Kathryn Cramer Brownell shows in her new book Showbiz Politics: Hollywood in American Political Life (University of North Carolina Press, 2014), Tinseltown was a major influence on political races almost since […]

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Kimberly Phillips-FeinInvisible Hands: The Businessmen’s Crusade Against the New Deal

April 8, 2015

[Cross-posted with permission from Who Makes Cents? A History of Capitalism Podcast.] Today we’ll focus on the history of resistance to the New Deal. In her book Invisible Hands: The Businessmen’s Crusade Against the New Deal (W. W. Norton, 2010), Kimberly Phillips-Fein details how many of the most prominent elites had their ideas and practices shaped by groups that […]

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Caroline Lee, Michael McQuarrie, and Edward Walker, eds.Democratizing Inequalities: Dilemma of the New Public Participation

April 6, 2015

Caroline Lee, Michael McQuarrie, and Edward Walker are the editors of Democratizing Inequalities: Dilemma of the New Public Participation (NYU Press 2015). Lee is associate professor of sociology at Lafayette College, McQuarrie is associate professor of sociology at London School of Economics and Political Science, and Walker is associate professor of sociology at the University […]

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Leigh Ann WheelerHow Sex Became a Civil Liberty

April 6, 2015

Leigh Ann Wheeler is professor of history at Binghamton University. Her book How Sex Became a Civil Liberty (Oxford University Press, 2013), examines the role of the American Civil Liberties Union in establishing sexual rights as grounded in the U.S. constitution. Wheeler begins in the bohemian New York with the personal biographies of individuals who […]

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Leilah DanielsonAmerican Gandhi: A.J. Muste and the History of Radicalism in the Twentieth Century

April 6, 2015

Leilah Danielson is an Associate Professor of History at Northern Arizona University and author of American Gandhi: A.J. Muste and the History of Radicalism in the Twentieth Century (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014). American Gandhi is a political, intellectual and religious biography of the pacifist, labor educator and organizer A.J. Muste whose radical career and […]

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Paula KaneSister Thorn and Catholic Mysticism in Modern America

March 31, 2015

Sister Thorn and Catholic Mysticism in Modern America (UNC Press, 2013) is a detailed journey into the life of Margaret Reilly, an American Irish-Catholic from New York who entered the Convent of the Good Shepherd in 1921, taking the name Sister Crown of Thorns. During the 1920s and 1930s, Sister Thorn became known as a stigmatic […]

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