Victor Pickard

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] The media system in the United States could have developed into something very different than what it is today. In fact, there was an era in which significant media reform was considered. This was a time when media consumers were tired of constant advertising, bias, and control by corporate entities, and instead wanted more “public-oriented” content. Sound at all familiar?

In his new book, America’s Battle for Media Democracy: The Triumph of Corporate Libertarianism and the Future of Media Reform (Cambridge University Press, 2014), Victor Pickard, an assistant professor of communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, examines the debates on media reform and policy from the early 20th century, focusing, in particular, on radio. Pickard revisits the significant media policy conflicts to analyze why the American media is the way it is, and how it could have been. In so doing, he considers what the current American media system means for the Web and other new media.

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Brian PurnellFighting Jim Crow in the County of Kings: The Congress of Racial Equality in Brooklyn

November 25, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] Scholars interested in the history of the civil rights movement in the North will definitely be interested in Brian Purnell‘s new book, Fighting Jim Crow in the County of Kings: The Congress of Racial Equality in Brooklyn (University Press of Kentucky, 2014). This case study of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) in Brooklyn joins one [...]

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Roundup on U.S. Immigration

November 24, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] With immigration in the news, it is worth revisiting some of the best New Books in Political Science podcasts on the subject for 2014. At the start of the summer, Benjamin Marquez brought to the podcast Democratizing Texas Politics: Race, Identity, and Mexican American Empowerment, 1945-2002 (University of Texas Press [...]

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Candis Watts SmithBlack Mosaic: The Politics of Black Pan-Ethnic Diversity

November 18, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science]  Candis Watts Smith is the author of Black Mosaic: The Politics of Black Pan-Ethnic Diversity (NYU Press, 2014). Watts Smith is assistant professor of political science at Williams College. How do Black immigrants in the US view their racial and ethnic identities? Do they identify with being Black, African American, or something [...]

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Rachel Clare Donaldson“I Hear America Singing”: Folk Music and National Identity

November 12, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Pop Culture] The last few decades has seen a turn toward traditional forms of American music; call it Americana, alternative country, or a new folk revival.  In “I Hear America Singing”: Folk Music and National Identity (Temple University Press, 2014), Rachel Clare Donaldson, an independent scholar based in Baltimore, offers a history of [...]

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Steven ConnAmericans Against the City: Anti-Urbanism in the Twentieth Century

November 12, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Urban Studies] Americans have a paradoxical relationship with cities, Steven Conn argues in his new book, Americans Against the City: Anti-Urbanism in the Twentieth Century (Oxford University Press, 2014).  Nearly three-quarters of the population lives near an urban center, the result of a centuries-old, global trend that reflects not just industrialization but the role [...]

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Bonnie J. MannSovereign Masculinity: Gender Lessons from the War on Terror

November 12, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Critical Theory] In the aftermath of 9/11, the American political landscape and its discourses took a peculiar turn. America’s national sovereignty-conceived as the expression of its indomitable masculinity-had been challenged. Its mythical invulnerability had been crushed. The response of the United States to these events was both disturbing and enlightening. It [...]

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Mike O’ConnorA Commercial Republic: America’s Enduring Debate over Democratic Capitalism

November 10, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Mike O’Connor is the author of A Commercial Republic: America’s Enduring Debate over Democratic Capitalism (University Press of Kansas 2014). He has also published articles in Contemporary Pragmatism and The Sixties. O’Connor teaches at Georgia State University in Atlanta, and holds a Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Texas at Austin. He was [...]

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Nadine HubbsRednecks, Queers, and Country Music

November 5, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Pop Culture] Academics don’t pay enough attention to class.  And when we do, too often we only magnify the tendency for working class subjects to be defined according to middle class norms; and according to those norms, they, not surprisingly, fail in one way or another, justifying their position beneath the middle [...]

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John Morrow and Jeffrey SammonsHarlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality

November 4, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Military History] John Morrow and Jeffrey Sammons share their insights on the story of the fabled 369th Infantry Regiment in their book, Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality (University Press of Kansas, 2014).  Our guests reveal a great deal about the state of African Americans in prewar New [...]

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