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Caseen Gaines

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On the thirtieth anniversary of the film, Caseen Gaines has written We Don't Need Roads: The Making of the Back to the Future Trilogy (Plume, 2015). The book is an engaging history of the Back to the Future series, from its earliest development through the ups and downs in the making of the three films. Gaines had access to people and documents that fill his book with great details.

 

 

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Jennifer L. Lawless and Richard L. FoxRunning from Office: Why Young Americans Are Turned off to Politics

June 28, 2015

Jennifer L. Lawless and Richard L. Fox are the authors of Running from Office: Why Young Americans Are Turned off to Politics (Oxford UP, 2015). Lawless is a Professor of Government and the Director of the Women & Politics Institute at American University. Fox is a Professor of Political Science at Loyola Marymount University. The two […]

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Suzanne BroderickReal War vs. Reel War: Veterans, Hollywood, and WWII

June 24, 2015

In hew new book Real War vs. Reel War: Veterans, Hollywood, and WWII (Rowman and Littlefield, 2015), Suzanne Broderick shares how she discussed a number of World War II films with veterans and others who experienced the conflict first hand.

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Claire Virginia EbyUntil Choice Do Us Part: Marriage Reform in the Progressive Era

June 23, 2015

Clare Virginia Eby is a professor of English at the University of Connecticut. In Until Choice Do Us Part: Marriage Reform in the Progressive Era (University of Chicago Press, 2014), Eby examines the origins of how we think of marriage through the theoretical and experimental reform of the institution in the progressive era. Marriage theorist […]

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Madeline Y. HsuThe Good Immigrants: How the Yellow Peril Became the Model Minority

June 23, 2015

With high educational and professional attainment, Asian Americans are often portrayed as the "Model Minority" in popular media. This portrayal, though, is widely panned by academics and activists who claim that it lacks nuance. Madeline Y. Hsu, Associate Professor, University of Texas at Austin, provides such nuance through here historical account of Chinese immigration to […]

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Ted A. SmithWeird John Brown: Divine Violence and the Limits of Ethics

June 23, 2015

People living in the modern west generally have no problem criticizing religiously-justified violence. It's therefore always interesting when I discuss John Brown, a man who legitimized anti-slavery violence Biblically. My most recent batch of students sought to resolve this tension by declaring John Brown to be "crazy but right." In his new book Weird John Brown: Divine […]

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Philip A. WallachTo The Edge: Legality, Legitimacy, and the Responses to the 2008 Financial Crisis

June 22, 2015

Philip A. Wallach is the author of To The Edge: Legality, Legitimacy, and the Responses to the 2008 Financial Crisis (Brookings Institution Press, 2015). Wallach is a fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution. There has been a lot written about the financial crisis of the late 2000s, but little with the attention to […]

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Akinyele Omowale UmojaWe Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement

June 20, 2015

The historiography of the southern Civil Rights Movement has long focused on the tactic of non-violence. With only a few notable exceptions, most scholarship locates the use of armed self-defense and other forms of armed resistance in northern cities while temporally, we usually think of these strategies as rising to prominence only later in the […]

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Ana Elizabeth RosasAbrazando el Espiritu: Bracero Families Confront the US-Mexico Border

June 20, 2015

The Emergency Farm Labor Program (a.k.a. Bracero Program) was initiated in 1942 as a bilateral wartime agreement between the governments of the United States and Mexico. The program's initial objectives were two-fold, address labor shortages in U.S. agriculture, and promote the modernization of rural Mexican peasants through a type of worker training (i.e., contract labor) […]

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Anita M. HarrisIthaca Diaries: Coming of Age in the 1960s

June 20, 2015

Sex, Drugs and Rock n' Roll. That's the stereotypical view of the 1960s. But in her memoir, Ithaca Diaries, Coming of Age in the 1960s (Cambridge Common Press, 2014), journalist and writer Anita M. Harris tells a more nuanced story about her tumultuous undergraduate years at Cornell University.    

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