Raluca Lucia CimpeanThe JFK Image: Profiles in Docudrama

Rowman and Littlefield, 2014

by Joel Tscherne on March 28, 2015

View on Amazon

Even long after his death, President John F. Kennedy continues to be a popular figure. In addition to documentaries, his influence appears in television and film. In her book The JFK Image: Profiles in Docudrama (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014), Raluca Lucia Cimpean examined nine docudramas that either included JFK as a character, or as an important influence on the characters. She also discussed the importance of the docudrama as a film genre. In this interview, she talks about the book, as well as how Kennedy’s image was important in her early life in Europe.

{ 0 comments }

Trygve ThrontveitWilliam James and the Quest for an Ethical Republic

March 27, 2015

William James (1842-1910) is one of the United States’ most far-reaching thinkers. His impact on philosophy, psychology, and religious studies is well documented, yet few scholars have considered James’ impact on the area of ethics and political thought. Trygve Throntveit’s new book William James and the Quest for an Ethical Republic (Palgrave, 2014) is a […]

Read the full article →

Paula T. ConnollySlavery in American Children’s Literature, 1790-2010

March 26, 2015

The “peculiar institution” upon which the US nation was founded is still rich for examination.  Perhaps this is why it is a subject to which 21st century authors continue to return.   In this exploration of slavery, Paula T. Connolly, author of Slavery in American Children’s Literature 1790 – 2010 (University of Iowa, 2013), provides an expansive […]

Read the full article →

Natalia Mehlman PetrzelaClassroom Wars: Language, Sex, and the Making of Modern Political Culture

March 26, 2015

The intersection between Spanish-bilingual education and sex education might not be immediately apparent. Yet, as Natalia Mehlman Petrzela shows in her new book, Classroom Wars: Language, Sex, and the Making of Modern Political Culture (Oxford University Press, 2015), the meeting between these two paradigms of education firmly connects in California during the 1960s and 70s. […]

Read the full article →

Christopher J. PhillipsThe New Math: A Political History

March 26, 2015

Christopher J. Phillips’ new book is a political history of the “New Math,” a collection of curriculum reform projects in the 1950s & 1960s that were partially sponsored by the NSF and involved hundreds of mathematicians, teachers, professors, administrators, parents, and students. The New Math: A Political History (University of Chicago Press, 2015) explores the […]

Read the full article →

Emily Alice KatzBringing Zion Home: Israel in American Jewish Culture, 1948-1967

March 26, 2015

World War Two and the establishment of the State of Israel significantly altered American Jewish attitudes toward Zionism. American Jews supported Israel during times of conflict, like the 1948 war. However, it was not until 1967 that Israel rose to the top of the American Jewish political agenda. Emily Alice Katz, in her new book, […]

Read the full article →

Robert PutnamOur Kids: The American Dream in Crisis

March 23, 2015

Robert Putnam is the author of Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis (Simon and Schuster, 2015). Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University. He has written fourteen books including the best-seller, Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. Few political scientists command attention like Robert […]

Read the full article →

Dorothy Sue Cobble, Linda Gordon, and Astrid HenryFeminism Unfinished: A Short, Surprising History of American Women’s Movements

March 21, 2015

Our guest today, Linda Gordon, is professor of history and humanities as New York University. Gordon and her co-authors Dorothy Sue Cobble and Astrid Henry have written Feminism Unfinished: A Short, Surprising History of American Women’s Movements (Liveright, 2014). The book documents the women’s movement since the winning of the franchise in 1920. Its aim is to recapture feminism as […]

Read the full article →

Wen JinPluralist Universalism: An Asian Americanist Critique of U.S. and Chinese Multiculturalisms

March 20, 2015

Wen Jin’s book, Pluralist Universalism: An Asian Americanist Critique of U.S. and Chinese Multiculturalisms (Ohio State Press, 2012), compares histories and modes of multiculturalism in China and the United States. Whereas many see few correlations between China’s ethnic policies and the multiculturalist policies of the U.S., Wen Jin brings these narratives and histories together to show […]

Read the full article →

Michelle NickersonMothers of Conservatism: Women and the Postwar Right

March 18, 2015

Recently, historians have shown that the modern conservative movement is older and more complex than has often been assumed by either liberals or historians. Michelle Nickerson’s book, Mothers of Conservatism: Women and the Postwar Right (Princeton University Press, 2012) expands that literature even further, demonstrating not only the longer roots of conservative interest in family issues, […]

Read the full article →