Catherine W. BishirCrafting Lives: African American Artisans in New Bern, North Carolina, 1770-1900

University of North Carolina Press, 2013

by Mireille Djenno on October 28, 2014

Catherine W. Bishir

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[Cross-posted from New Books in African American Studies]  Seeking to fill the gap in scholarship focused on African American artisans in the American South, Catherine W. Bishir uses the very specific location of New Bern, North Carolina to “dig a deep hole” and produce a longitudinal study of black artisans that moves chronologically from the colonial period, through the early national period to the period following the Civil War. Crafting Lives: African American Artisans in New Bern, North Carolina, 1770-1900 (University of North Carolina Press, 2013) looks at how artisans, enslaved and free, negotiated a complex social landscape that relied on their skills but circumscribed their lives. Specifically, Bishir examines the broader American artisan-citizen identity, the hallmarks of which are independence, mastery and self-determination and how the racial mores of the South made the enactment of this identity a problematic proposition for black artisans in New Bern despite its relatively lenient racial laws.

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Kirk Randazzo and Richard WatermanChecking the Courts: Law, Ideology, and Contingent Discretion

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Kirk Randazzo is the author (with Richard Waterman) of Checking the Courts: Law, Ideology, and Contingent Discretion (SUNY Press 2014). Randazzo is associate professor of political science at the University of South Carolina. He has previously written several books on the courts and foreign policy. How does legislative language affect the courts? Randazzo [...]

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